Black pottery tripod jar

Li tripod beaker, with a cylindrical body flares out at the rim, and expands organically in its lower half to rest on three udder-shaped legs. It appears to have been dipped into black slip and burnished to produce a smooth, shiny surface.
Artist Unknown, China
2200 BC - 1600 BC
Such tripod beakers are frequently discovered in the elite tombs of the Lower Xiajiadian Culture, which flourished what is today Inner Mongolia between about 2200 BCE and 1600 BCE. This is the transitional period to the early Bronze Age in China. Frequent discovery of hill-top fortifications associated with these cemetery attests to intercommunity competition and violence in this society. While this beaker appears to have been dipped into black slip and burnished to produce a smooth, shiny surface, many others were painted with zoomorphic designs in polychrome pigments suggesting their function as ceremonial objects. In a funerary context, it probably held wine for the afterlife or was once used in the feast at the funeral.
Gift of www.silkroadtrade.com owners Seung Man Kim, Robert Piao, Daniel Shin and Hemin Quan
2003/2.22
Saturday, August 13, 2022
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