In the Mountain Fastness

Dark landscape set atop a rocky mountain with sparse vegetation. There is a small boulder in the left foreground space with a dead tree standing beside it; in the right foreground there is what appears to be a small cave. A dead and broken tree lies across the bottom of the picture frame. There are mountains in the distance and a dark stormy sky above with a break in the clouds near the center of the canvas that reveals a sunny blue sky.
Daniel Huntington
1850
“In the Mountain Fastness” is a dark, moody, idealized landscape painting whose title is derived from a line in the popular classic Protestant allegory “The Pilgrim’s Progress” by John Bunyan, a Christian writer and preacher. Huntington believed that art had a high moral purpose and was a medium of spiritual truth. This work reflects Huntington’s deeply held personal religious beliefs and celebrates the grandeur of God’s power and creation in nature.
Gift of Mr. Jean A. Wetmore
1916.1
Wednesday, June 20, 2018